June 6, 2007

It's pronounced ofTEN, bitch!

Free plug! I'm posting a short (and I do mean short, it's only 1 minute long) film by my good pal Simon Anlezark. It's called "It's Not Often" and it's kind of awesome (but I'm being paid to say that... aren't I Simon?!). Hasn't this happened to you at some stage? I'm sure it's happened to most. Anyway. I love it. It is only a minute so it's not like you can't fit it into your busy schedule.

By the way, it is pronounced "often", bitch. Leanr egnlish propar plzthnx.



I love how Rebecca says "Who cares?" I don't know why though...

3 comments:

Paxton Hernandez said...

wtf? I didn't get it = (

Was it the accent?

Damn it!

P.S. By the way, my TVsuggestion of the month is On the Lot. Whoa. I'm a a fan now. Shorts, shorts and shorts. After all, those movies made by students will be the only original stuff coming out of Hollywood for the next 4 months? Yikes, I hate summer.

Colin said...

From Answers.com:
"During the 15th century English experienced a widespread loss of certain consonant sounds within consonant clusters, as the (d) in handsome and handkerchief, the (p) in consumption and raspberry, and the (t) in chestnut and often. In this way the consonant clusters were simplified and made easier to articulate. With the rise of public education and literacy and, consequently, people's awareness of spelling in the 19th century, sounds that had become silent sometimes were restored, as is the case with the t in often, which is now frequently pronounced. In other similar words, such as soften and listen, the t generally remains silent."

Kamikaze Camel said...

Pax, the girls were discussing about how the one who says "often" had fallen over and nobody helped, they just kept walking - well, while they were chatting a man who had stolen another girl's handbag ran right past them and they didn't even notice when the girl said "that man stole my bag!". They just kept discussing a trivial topic.

...yeah?

Colin, thanks for confirming. Only people in the stoneage say "offen". (okay, not really, but you get my point)